Don’t trust Wikipedia

The unreliability of Wikipedia as a source of information is common knowledge. Articles pertaining to climate are certainly not an exception, with William Connolly having censored anything concerning the medieval warm period. Given these events, I came across an article that peaked by interest; Temperature Record of the Past 1000 Years. Would they show some sort of hockeystick, or a reconstruction that, um, I don’t know, didn’t rely on tree rings. Surprise, surprise it’s a hockeystick. Well, if it’s on Wikipedia it must be true, right?

“The methodology and data sets used in creating the Mann et al. (1998) version of the hockey stick graph are disputed by Stephen McIntyre and Ross McKitrick, but the graph is overall acknowledged by the scientific community.”

Overall acknowledged by the scientific community? I guess that would be why the IPCC has backed away from MBH98 and why the independent Wegman Report declared McIntyre and McKitrick’s arguments to be “valid and compelling”.

I guess all you can do is laugh at something like this. Who would have thought that a site that was my only source for all my high school assignments could be so unreliable?

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About Climate Nonconformist

Hi, I'm the climatenonconformist (not my real name), and I am a global warming skeptic, among the few in generation Y. With Australia facing the prospect of a carbon tax, we need to be asking the simple question; where is the evidence that our emissions are causing any dangerous warming?
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